JC Studies Blog


I want to close this study with three observations on the value of the Feast of Pentecost for the church—for you and me—today.


1)​ We must rethink the whole paradigm of salvation


The​ ​most offensive​ ​characterization,​ ​the​ ​grossest​ ​misrepresentation​ ​of​ ​the​ ​God​ ​of​ ​Israel—and Israel​ ​itself—in​ ​all​ ​of​ ​Christian​ ​theology​ ​throughout​ ​the​ ​centuries,​ ​has​ ​been​ ​the persistent​ ​belief that Israel​ ​was​ ​saved​ ​by​ ​works​ ​and​ ​the church is saved by​ ​grace. Said another way, ​Israel​ ​earned salvation ​by keeping the​ ​Law​ while​ ​we receive it​ ​by​ ​grace alone. Baloney!

Not​ ​only​ ​does​ ​this​ ​misrepresent​ ​Israel, but it also maligns​ ​the​ ​God​ ​of​ ​Israel.​


It​ ​was​ his grace that​ ​saved​ ​Israel​ ​out​ ​of​ ​Egypt.​ ​​​It is quite telling that most Christians don’t understand something quite foundational, biblically speaking. The​ ​Exodus​ ​story​ ​is​ ​a​ ​wonderful​ ​paradigm​ ​of​ ​what salvation​ ​is​ ​all​ ​about​! It is the LORD who redeems​ ​by​ ​the​ ​blood​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Passover lamb.​ ​​​Israel​ ​was​ ​saved​ ​because​ ​they​ ​were​ ​under​ ​the gracious provision of the​ ​lamb’s blood.​ Understand this. There was nothing ​Israel did to merit salvation; it was a gift from a giving God.


Think about it, ​God​ ​did​ ​not​ ​send​ ​Moses​ ​to​ ​Israel​ ​like​ ​a​ ​traveling salesman​ ​with​ ​the​ ​Ten​ ​Commandments​ ​in​ ​his​ ​briefcase​. “Here Israel,” he says, “If you​ ​buy these​ ​commandments,​ ​God​ ​will​ ​redeem​ ​you​ ​and​ ​save​ ​you.” No, ​God​ ​saved​ ​Israel​ ​for​ ​no reason​ ​other​ ​than​ ​that​ ​he​ loved her. The LORD​ ​so​ ​loved​ ​Israel​ ​that​ ​he​ ​sent​ ​the​ ​Redeemer. After​ ​her rescue, he​ ​says,​ ​“Here​ ​is​ ​the​ ​instruction​ ​manual​ ​for​ ​living​ in​ the shalom of my care.”


God​ ​saves​ ​Israel​ ​by​ ​the​ ​blood​ ​of​ ​the​ ​lamb, thereby forging a​ ​holy​ ​nation.​


He​ ​wanted​ ​to take​ ​Israel​ ​as​ ​a​ ​bride, so he​ ​brings​ ​her​ ​to​ ​a​ ​place​ ​of​ ​revelation​ ​and​ ​responsibility at​ ​Sinai. ​The rabbis​ ​saw​ ​this​ ​whole​ ​Exodus 24 passage​ as ​a​ ​marriage​ ​metaphor, from which they drew ceremonial practices for Jewish weddings.​

  • God​ ​comes​ ​like​ ​a​ ​bridegroom to​ ​Mt.​ ​Sinai​; the​ bridegrooms​ ​of​ ​old​ ​would​ ​come​ ​preceded​ ​by​ ​fire.​

  • His​ ​bride​ ​has washed; she​ ​has​ ​purified and consecrated​ ​herself,​ waiting​ ​for​ ​her​ ​bridegroom to​ ​come.

  • He​ ​comes,​ ​and​ ​then​ ​his​ ​agent​ ​Moses​ ​reads​ ​the​ ​marriage​ ​contract,​ ​the ketubah.

Notice​ ​what​ ​happens. After Moses​ ​builds​ ​an​ ​altar he, took half of the blood and put it in basins, and half of the blood he threw against the altar. Then he took the Book of the Covenant and read it in the hearing of the people. And they said, “All that the LORD has spoken we will do, and we will be obedient.” And Moses took the blood and threw it on the people and said, “Behold the blood of the covenant that the LORD has made with you in accordance with all these words.” - Exodus 24:6-8

Moses​ ​reads​ the covenant to​ ​the​ ​people,​ ​just​ ​like​ ​an​ ​agent​ ​reads​ ​the marriage​ ​contract​ ​to​ ​the potential​ ​bride.​ If​ ​the​ ​bride​ wishes​ ​to​ ​enter​ ​into​ ​the​ ​marriage​ ​contract,​ ​she says,​ “I do.” What​ ​does​ ​Israel​ ​say​ ​after​ ​Moses​ ​reads​ ​the​ ​agreement? They​ ​respond, “We​ ​will.”​ In​ ​effect,​ ​the​ ​bride​ ​said “I do” to the love of God. My friends, we are witnessing God’s​ ​love for​ Israel.


Sinai​ ​was​ ​not​ ​just​ ​some​ ​stopover​ ​on​ ​the​ ​journey​ ​to​ ​the​ ​promised​ ​land.​


It​ ​wasn’t​ ​a​ ​rest stop along the way; in​ ​a​ ​real​ ​sense, it is​ the​ ​destination​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Exodus.​ It​ was​ ​the​ ​place​ ​of​ ​God’s revelation​ ​and​ ​instruction.


The LORD said to Moses, “Come up to me on the mountain and wait there, that I may give you the tablets of stone, with the law and the commandment, which I have written for their instruction.” - Exodus 24:12

The​ ​word​ ​instruction​ ​here​ ​is​ ​yarah.​ ​​​Yarah​ ​is​ ​the source​ ​of​ ​the​ ​word​ ​torah (law in this verse).​ ​​Torah​ ​is​ ​teaching.​ God​ ​saves​ ​Israel,​ ​joins​ ​himself​ ​to​ ​her as​ ​a​ ​bridegroom​ ​to​ ​a​ ​bride,​ ​and​ ​then​ ​gives​ ​her​ ​instructions​ ​on​ ​how​ ​to​ ​live​ ​in​ ​the​ ​way​ ​of peace.


What is missing here? There​ ​is​ ​no heinous, false​ dichotomy​ between​ ​grace​ ​and​ ​law as later Christian theology would posit.​ Now let’s be clear, grace​ ​without​ ​law​ ​is​ ​license, and ​law​ ​without​ ​grace​ ​is​ ​legalism​—both are necessary. There is God’s loving​ ​initiative​ ​and​ ​your​ ​faithful, obedient​ ​response.​ We can say it this way, keeping​ Torah for​ ​Israel​ ​was​ ​not​ ​bondage,​ ​it​ ​was​ ​a​ ​sign​ ​of the end of bondage, of liberation​ ​from​ slavery in Egypt.


Grace​ ​precedes​ ​and​ ​proceeds​ ​into​ ​the giving​ ​of​ ​the​ ​Torah. The​ ​Law is​ ​a​ ​pattern​ ​of​ ​life, for life.

This​ ​paradigm​ is​ ​not​ ​new; it​ ​goes​ ​​ ​back​ ​to​ ​Genesis.​ Has​ ​it​ ​ever occurred​ ​to​ ​you​ ​there​ ​was​ ​law​ ​in​ ​the​ ​garden​ ​of​ ​Eden?​ God​ ​created​ ​by​ ​his​ ​grace,​ then he​ ​gave​ ​some​ ​guidelines, “You may not eat​ ​of​ ​this​ ​tree,​ ​it​ ​is​ ​forbidden.​ ​​​You​ ​may​ ​eat​ ​of​ ​this tree,​ ​it​ ​is​ ​permitted.” ​That​ ​was​ ​law, commandment, instruction.​


The​ ​paradigm​ is​ ​always​ ​the​ ​same,​ ​God creates and recreates​ ​by his​ ​gracious, loving volition. ​And​ then​ ​he​ ​gives instruction. If​ you​ ​violate​ ​his words,​ ​you​ ​separate​ ​yourself​ ​from him, from each other, from​ ​the​ ​fullness​ ​of shalom, just​ ​as it​ ​happened​ ​to​ ​Adam​ ​and​ ​Eve.

The​ ​law​ ​was​ ​given​ ​to​ ​preserve paradise​ ​and​ ​to​ ​prosper​ ​Adam and Eve because​ ​obedience​ ​leads​ ​to​ ​life.​


In Judaism, the​ ​spindles​ ​upon​ ​which​ ​the​ ​Torah scroll​ ​is​ ​wrapped, which​ ​you​ ​lay​ ​hold​ ​of​ ​when​ ​you​ ​lift​ ​up​ ​the​ ​Word​ ​of​ ​God, are called​ trees​ ​of​ ​life.​ ​​​God’s​ ​Word​ ​is​ ​a​ ​tree​ ​of​ ​life.​ I urge you to eat​ ​the​ ​scroll​,​ taste and​ ​see​ ​if​ ​it isn’t​ good, if​ ​it​ ​doesn’t​ ​bring​ ​healing,​ ​peace,​ ​salvation, and​ ​restoration​ ​to​ ​your​ ​life. ​Don’t seek​ ​after​ ​your​ ​​ ​ways​ ​of​ ​iniquity, ​eating​ from the​ ​tree​ ​of​ the knowledge of ​good​ ​and​ ​evil​—deciding for yourself​ ​what​ ​is​ ​good​ ​and​ ​evil.


In rethinking salvation, we must​ ​also​ ​move​ ​to​ ​the​ ​conviction​ ​that​ ​it​ is​ ​purposeful beyond​ ​our​ ​own​ ​little​ ​individual​ ​egoistic​ ​reasons.​ God​ ​saves​ ​us​ ​for​ ​his purposes as well​ ​as​ ​for​ ​our​ ​eternal​ ​rewards. His initiative​ ​should​ ​elicit​ ​our​ ​faithfulness. It is​ ​time​ ​that​ ​we​ ​take​ ​seriously​ ​the​ ​summons​ ​included with​ ​our​ ​salvation​, our call​ ​to be a royal​ priesthood,​ ​to​ ​be​ ​built​ ​into​ ​a ​holy​ ​tabernacle​ ​suitable​ ​for​ ​God’s Spirit to dwell.​


How will​ ​you​ ​respond​ ​to​ ​the​ ​gift​ ​of​ ​your​ ​salvation?




This study is from a professionally produced transcription of the audio recording. It was edited for readability by the team at JC Studies.

Dwight A. Pryor (1945-2011) was a gifted Bible teacher of exceptional clarity and depth who earned the friendship and admiration of both Christian and Jewish scholars—in the United States and Israel—as well as the respect and appreciation of followers of Jesus around the world. His expertise in the language, literature, and culture of Israel during the life and time of Jesus and the early church yield insights that nourish every area of faith and practice.


Dwight founded JC Studies in 1984 to edify the people of God. Click here to explore over fifty of his audio and video seminars.


Pentecost (Shavuot) is essential to kingdom people. Without it, we fail to understand our high calling fully, and we fall prey to the temptation to delegate our spirituality to professionals. Ultimately, without it, we are missing some of the most meaningful truths about our great God. I want to give you three characteristics of the LORD and his purposes that the feast of Pentecost teaches us.


1.​ ​HE​ ​IS​ ​AN​ ​​IN-BREAKING​ ​GOD​

The LORD,​ ​by​ ​his​ ​initiative,​ ​broke​ ​into​ ​human​ ​affairs​ ​and​ ​showed​ ​himself​ ​as​ ​sovereign. ​​It​ ​was a​ ​cosmic​ ​event that​ ​happened​ ​at​ ​Sinai. The​ rabbis​ ​call​ ​it​ ​the​ ​second​ ​act​ ​of​ ​creation.​ In the​ ​first creation,​ ​he​ ​made​ ​the​ ​world. In​ ​the​ ​second​ ​creation, he​ ​made​ ​a​ ​holy​ ​nation that​ ​was​ ​to​ ​participate​ ​in​ ​the​ ​redemption​ ​and​ ​the​ ​blessing​ ​of​ ​the​ ​world.

In​ ​the​ ​first creation,​ ​he​ ​made everything​ ​by​ ​his​ ​word,​ ​turning​ ​chaos​ ​into​ ​order.​ In the​ ​second​ ​creation, he gave​ ​his​ ​word​ ​that​ ​transformed the​ ​least​ ​of​ ​the​ ​peoples​ ​into​ ​a​ ​holy​ ​nation,​ ​a​ ​kingdom of​ ​priests.


His​ ​word​ ​turns​ ​chaos​ ​into​ ​order;​ ​his​ ​word​ ​takes​ ​the​ ​least​ ​and​ ​turns​ ​it​ ​into​ ​a priest.


And​ ​his​ ​word​ ​will​ ​do​ ​the​ ​same​ ​for​ ​you​ ​and​ ​for​ ​me. Are you getting this? You​ ​are​ ​a​ ​priest! Yet too​ ​many​ ​of​ ​you,​ ​like​ ​me,​ ​are​ ​sitting down​ ​on​ ​the​ ​job.


2.​ ​​​​​HE​ ​IS​ ​AN​ ​​INDWELLING​ ​GOD​

The LORD​ ​is​ ​looking​ ​for​ ​a​ ​people​ ​who​ ​will​ ​bear​ ​his​ ​image​ ​and bless​ ​the​ ​nations​ ​in​ ​his​ ​name. This God is in search of man, that is his perennial purpose. Therefore​ ​salvation—in the​ ​context​ ​of​ ​Pentecost—is​ ​not ​some​ ​escape​ ​to​ ​another​ ​world,​ ​it​ ​is​ ​not​ ​a​ ​free​ ​pass to​ ​heaven. Salvation is​ ​a​ ​summons​ ​to​ ​serve the​ ​Sovereign​ ​of​ ​the​ ​universe.


If you​ ​are​ ​not​ ​responding​ ​to​ ​the​ ​call​ ​you​ ​are​ missing​ ​out on the blessing.

Pentecost​ ​teaches​ ​us​ ​that​ ​salvation​ includes responding to and serving​ ​God​ ​here​ ​and​ ​now. His kingdom​ ​is being realized in​ ​this​ ​world. The reward​ ​of our​ ​salvation is​ ​in​ ​the​ ​world​ ​to​ ​come. God saves us​ ​in​ ​order​ ​to​ ​rule​ ​and reign​ ​over​ ​us​ ​through​ ​his​ ​revelation. And through us, he wants his​ ​world to​ ​come​ ​into​ ​its​ ​divine​ ​calling​ ​and purpose. The bottom line is this; he​ ​is​ ​looking​ ​for​ ​a​ ​people​ ​to​ ​dwell​ ​in,​ ​among, and​ ​through.

3.​ ​​​​​HE​ ​IS​ AN ​​INCLUSIVE GOD

All​ ​of​ ​Israel​ ​saw​ ​these​ ​events. This​ ​was​ ​not​ ​some individual​ ​mystic experience​ ​upon​ ​a​ ​high​ ​mountain having a spiritual hallucination after fasting for​ ​forty ​days. All​ ​Israel​ ​heard​ ​the​ ​word​ ​of​ ​the​ LORD go forth.​ ​​​It​ ​was​ ​a​ ​cosmic​ ​event,​ ​not​ ​some​ ​private​ ​revelation.​


The​ ​sages​ ​say​ ​Torah​ ​was given​ ​specifically​ ​in​ ​the​ ​desert​ ​and​ ​not​ ​in​ ​the​ ​Promised Land. Why?


Because it​ ​was an​ ​open space where​ ​anybody​ ​could​ ​​come. The Torah of God is​ ​given​ ​in​ ​a​ ​public​ ​place for all. You and​ ​I ​have​ ​been​ ​brought​ ​to​ ​Mt.​ ​Sinai in Jesus, we​ ​have​ ​been​ ​brought​ ​to​ ​that​ ​place where​ ​we​ ​have​ ​been​ ​joined​ ​together​ ​with​ ​Israel.

We read in Leviticus​ ​23:17 how​ ​two​ ​loaves​ ​with leaven​ ​are​ ​to​ ​be​ ​waved​ ​before​ ​the​ ​Lord​ ​at​ ​Pentecost,​ ​in​ ​marked​ ​contrast​ ​to​ ​Passover​ ​in which​ ​there​ ​is​ ​no​ ​leaven.


1) At​ ​Passover​ ​it​ ​is​ ​the​ ​lamb without​ ​blemish​ ​that​ ​is​ ​sacrificed. Jesus is our​ ​Passover​ ​lamb (1 Cor 5:7).​

2) At​ ​Pentecost​ ​it​ ​is​ ​to​ ​be​ ​you​ ​and​ ​me​ ​– ordinary​ ​people,​ ​the​ ​greatest​ ​and​ ​the​ ​least.​ ​​​We​ ​all​ ​have leaven​ ​and​ ​sin​ ​in​ ​our​ ​lives,​ ​but​ ​we​ ​are​ ​still​ ​to​ ​be​ ​offered​ ​up​ ​to​ ​God.


I see the two loaves as a picture of​ Israel​ ​and​ ​the nations that join the new covenant in Jesus.​ ​​​Because of the​ ​one Lamb, two loaves​ ​are​ ​offered​ ​up​ ​before​ ​the​ ​Lord​ ​as​ ​a sacrifice​ ​of​ ​service,​ ​of​ ​worship​, as ​an​ ​offering​ ​unto the God of Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob. With this in mind, listen afresh to these texts from Ephesians that were foundational for Paul.


Remember that you were at that time separated from Christ, alienated from the commonwealth of Israel and strangers to the covenants of promise, having no hope and without God in the world.

Then he uses this​ ​imagery​ ​of​ ​how​ ​the​ ​two​ ​have​ ​been​ ​joined into one​ ​in​ ​the Messiah.​ ​​​

But now in Christ Jesus you who once were far off have been brought near by the blood of Christ. For he himself is our peace, who has made us both one and has broken down in his flesh the dividing wall of hostility by abolishing the law of commandments expressed in ordinances, that he might create in himself one new man in place of the two, so making peace, and might reconcile us both to God in one body through the cross, thereby killing the hostility.

So far, so good. But to what end you might ask?


So then you are no longer strangers and aliens, but you are fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God, built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Christ Jesus himself being the cornerstone, in whom the whole structure, being joined together, grows into a holy temple in the Lord.

Here​ ​he​ employs the​ ​same temple language​ ​that​ ​Peter​ ​uses! We are saved to serve as a kingdom of priests. We are to be a holy nation unto the Lord. Hallelujah!


There will always be those who say, "Well,​ ​all​ ​I​ ​care​ ​about​ ​is​ ​getting​ ​saved​, getting​ ​some​ ​blessings,​ ​and going​ ​on​ ​to​ ​my​ eternal ​reward."​ For you, I pray that God​ will send​ ​a​ ​Moses​ from​ ​the​ ​mountain​ ​to cast​ ​down​ ​the​ ​covenant​, smash​ and pulverize ​the​ ​idols​ ​of​ ​our​ ​existence and say, "Take​ ​eat,​ ​this​ ​is​ ​your​ ​God."


Paul has encouraging words for those who say, "Oh Lord, I am not sufficient for these things." In him you also are being built together into a dwelling place for God by the Spirit.




This study is from a professionally produced transcription of the audio recording. It was edited for readability by the team at JC Studies.

Dwight A. Pryor (1945-2011) was a gifted Bible teacher of exceptional clarity and depth who earned the friendship and admiration of both Christian and Jewish scholars—in the United States and Israel—as well as the respect and appreciation of followers of Jesus around the world. His expertise in the language, literature, and culture of Israel during the life and time of Jesus and the early church yield insights that nourish every area of faith and practice.


Dwight founded JC Studies in 1984 to edify the people of God. Click here to explore over fifty of his audio and video seminars.


You yourselves have seen what I did to the Egyptians, and how I bore you on eagles’ wings and brought you to myself. Now therefore, if you will indeed obey my voice and keep my covenant, you shall be my treasured possession among all peoples, for all the earth is mine; and you shall be to me a kingdom of priests and a holy nation. These are the words that you shall speak to the people of Israel. - Exodus 19:4-6

At the foot of Sinai, the mount of revelation, the​ ​people​​ ​fail​ ​in​ ​their​ ​high​ ​calling.​ ​​​Though they​ ​hear​ ​God​ ​speak​,​ ​they tremble and​ ​prefer​ ​to​ ​continue​ ​walking by​ ​sight​ ​and​ ​not​ ​by​ ​faith.​ They tell Moses, “You be the​ ​priest,​ ​go​ ​up​ ​the​ ​mountain to hear from the LORD,​ and we​ ​will​ ​listen​ ​to​ ​all​ ​you​ ​have​ ​to say.” ​​The​ ​word​ ​listen​ ​in​ ​Hebrew​ ​has​ ​the​ ​connotation​ ​to ​obey.


The​ ​irony​ ​and the​ ​spiritual​ ​lesson here​ ​is​ ​that​ ​at​ ​the​ ​moment​ ​of​ ​Israel’s​ ​most significant​ ​spiritual​ ​opportunity,​ ​they suffered their​ ​greatest​ ​spiritual​ ​defeat.

While​ ​Moses​ ​approaches​ ​God​ ​and​ ​goes​ ​up​ ​the​ ​mountain​ ​to​ ​receive the​ Torah​ ​for​ ​his​ ​redeemed people​, what do they do? They​ ​create and worship a​ ​golden​ ​calf.​ ​​​The sages note with sorrow that​ this is​ ​the​ ​greatest​ ​sin​ ​in​ ​the​ ​history of​ ​Israel.​


Israel falls​ ​back, and​ ​in​ ​falling​ ​back​ ​they​ ​fall​ ​down. That​ ​should​ ​be​ ​a​ ​sobering​ ​thought​ ​to​ ​each​ ​of​ ​us in the new covenant, especially​ ​to​ ​those​ ​of​ ​us​ ​in vocational​ ​ministry.​ Rather than judge, we should see ourselves in the mirror of their experience. How do we respond at the moment​ ​of our​ ​greatest​ ​opportunity—at​ ​the moment​ ​of​ ​divine​ ​visitation,​ ​supernatural​ ​demonstration,​ ​and​ ​Godly​ ​revelation​?

Peter ​correlates​ ​this​ ​Exodus​ ​terminology​ ​with​ ​the​ ​church,​ ​for​ ​you​ ​and​ ​me. These​ ​texts​ ​that​ ​we​ ​are dealing​ ​with​ have​, ​in​ ​a​ ​very​ ​measurable​ ​way,​ ​changed​ ​my​ ​life.​ ​​​God​ ​has​ brought us out of Egypt, ​saved​ ​us through​ ​the​ ​power​ ​of​ ​the​ ​blood,​ ​for​ ​his​ ​purposes and​ ​for​ ​his sake.​ ​​​And​ ​he​ ​applies​ ​to​ ​us​ ​the​ ​​ ​same​ ​terminology​ ​that​ ​he​ ​applies​ ​to​ ​Israel​ ​because we​ ​have​ ​been​ ​grafted​ ​in.


As you come to him, a living stone rejected by men but in the sight of God chosen and precious, you yourselves like living stones are being built up as a spiritual house, to be a holy priesthood, to offer spiritual sacrifices acceptable to God through Jesus Christ. - 1 Peter 2:4-5


This understanding​ ​can​ ​literally​ ​change​ ​your​ ​whole​ ​outlook​ ​on​ ​life.

Peter​ ​makes​ ​it​ ​very​ ​clear​ ​that​ ​our​ ​salvation​ ​is​ ​all about​ ​being​ ​joined​ ​together​ ​into​ ​the​ ​construction​ ​of​ a tabernacle (mishkan)​ ​in​ ​which the​ ​Spirit​ ​of​ ​God​ ​can​ ​dwell.​ ​​​His​ ​glory​ ​filled​ ​the​ ​tabernacle; now, his glory fills his people.​ ​​​We​ ​are​ ​being​ ​built into​ ​a​ ​spiritual​ ​house​ ​to​ ​be​ ​a holy​ ​nation​ ​of​ ​priests​ ​offering​ ​spiritual sacrifices.​ ​​​In​ ​other​ ​words,​ ​to​ ​engage​ ​in​ ​ministry​ ​on​ ​behalf​ ​of​ ​the​ ​owner​ ​of​ ​the​ ​house.


This is exciting stuff. Paul uses the same terminology in 1 Corinthians 3. Do you not know that you are God’s temple and that God’s Spirit dwells in you? If anyone destroys God’s temple, God will destroy him. For God’s temple is holy, and you are that temple (vv 16-17). Do you see how powerful this image is to Peter and Paul? They knew the story and the texts from Exodus by heart. It is part of their lives and extraordinary that they would apply it to you and me.

That is why Pentecost (Shavuot) is essential to kingdom people. Without it, we fail to understand our high calling fully, and we fall prey to the temptation to delegate our spirituality to professionals. Ultimately, without it, we are missing some of the most meaningful truths about our great God. I want to give you three characteristics of God and his intent that the feast of Pentecost teaches us.




This study is from a professionally produced transcription of the audio recording. It was edited for readability by the team at JC Studies.

Dwight A. Pryor (1945-2011) was a gifted Bible teacher of exceptional clarity and depth who earned the friendship and admiration of both Christian and Jewish scholars—in the United States and Israel—as well as the respect and appreciation of followers of Jesus around the world. His expertise in the language, literature, and culture of Israel during the life and time of Jesus and the early church yield insights that nourish every area of faith and practice.


Dwight founded JC Studies in 1984 to edify the people of God. Click here to explore over fifty of his audio and video seminars.

Featured Posts
Teaching Series